Jetske Visser_Dutch Invertuals_2014_06
January 30, 2015

Colour, radiance and diffraction of multiple layers become one entity.
The semi-transparent layers divide spaces.

In collaboration with Michiel Martens.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Michiel Martens, Raw Color

Jetske-visser-forgotten-memory-front
January 28, 2015

In the movie ” Forgotten memory” you step into the world of dementia. An invisible and hidden world is exposed. How look everyday things through the eyes of someone suffering from dementia. How do they experience their environment? What is a teapot if you don’t know what a teapot is?

Photography: Jetske Visser, Joost Goovers

jetske-visser-ROET-front
January 28, 2015

Soot is impure carbon particles resulting from the incomplete burning of organic matter. While the black carbon in it is one of the biggest causes of the hothouse effect, pure carbon molecules are present in all known life forms and essential to all living systems.

Visser uses this coal-black material as a pigment in her fabric dye by collecting layers of soot created by burning oil inside a the lamp. A set of instruments is used as tool for collecting and processing the soot.

*’Roet’, Dutch for soot. Photography: Jetske Visser, Raw Color

jetske-visser-Roet-17
January 27, 2015

Soot is impure carbon particles resulting from the incomplete burning of organic matter. While the black carbon in it is one of the biggest causes of the hothouse effect, pure carbon molecules are present in all known life forms and essential to all living systems.

Visser uses this coal-black material as a pigment in her fabric dye by collecting layers of soot created by burning oil inside a the lamp. The color intensity is determined by the number of hours the lamp burns and the strength of the fixative used. The textile industry is one of the most polluting of all industries, and the appropriation of a notorious pollutant for the coloring process bears witness to large-scale environmental issue.

*’Roet’, Dutch for soot. Photography: Jetske Visser, Raw Color

TO-THE-BONE-jetske-visser-michiel-martens-2
January 27, 2015

The earliest characteristics of our civilisation can be seen in treated bones. Bone is a material that has historically been used to make tools jewelry and other products. Today bone is viewed as waste; it is crushed and burnt. Michiel and Jetske are giving bone another lease of life by highlighting its beauty.

These images show a collection of shapes made from cow bone. With this research they examine the characteristics of the material and explore its usability. SEARCHING FOR A WAY TO USE THE OLD SKELETON AND CREATING A NEW FRAMEWORK.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Michiel Martens

Visser_Martens_HUE_tables_1
January 27, 2015

Two layers of acrylic glass seem to diffract by the touch of light. The short side glows, one single color changes into multiple tones. HUE-tables are available in different colors, sizes and heights.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Michiel Martens

jetske_hydrophobia_02
January 26, 2015

A fascination for the old Japanese Suminagashi technique forms the basis for the experimental methodology where the hydrophobic reaction between water and oil based pigments is used to create a unique graphic pattern. Due to this process of discrepancy a fractal motif arises on the surface of the water. This fluid pattern of liquid tension is captured and fixated on delicate silk and fine ceramics. A fleeting two-dimensional surface transforms into a tangible and solid whole.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Raw Color

Jetske_Visser_raw_materials_1.1_front
January 24, 2015

Because of the substantial water consumption, the chemical dyes and worldwide transport, the textile industry is a serious pollutant. Jetske Visser had studied new production methods using locally sourced materials. Excess and waste materials from the local industry around National Park the Biesbosch, combined with natural resources, have formed the starting point for the yarns, dyes and new dying techniques. Raw Materials, collection Biesbosch is an industrially produced, locally sourced collection of fabrics.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Joost Goovers

Jetske_Visser_9
January 23, 2015

Steam gave rise to an industrial revolution. It created opportunities for machine-produced products and new speeds in transportation. For the textile industry steaming became a method to fixate the dye in the fabric.

The project ‘Steam’ uses these known qualities of water vapour to simultaneously create and fix the print onto the fabric. Unlike contemporary print methods, where intricate details and sterile regularities are dominant, ‘Steam’ demonstrates an enchanting dialogue between control and coincidence. The created patterns and shapes are the imprint of the steam on the fabric, records of an ephemeral moment

Photography: Jetske Visser, Raw color
Thanks to: www.mirte-engelhard.nl and Textile Museum Tilburg

Jetske-Visser-Hydro-phobia-5-front
January 23, 2015

The fractal patterns on these silk scarves are created by the hydrophobic reaction between water and oil based pigments. Due to this reaction a subtle pattern arises on the surface of the water, Visser captured and fixated this fluid pattern of liquid tension on delicate silk.

Photography: Jetske Visser, Michiel Martens

jetske_visser_starting_something_roet_2
January 20, 2015

During the Beijing Design Week 2013 ‘Starting Something’ was presented by the guest city of Amsterdam. The exhibition started an active dialog between alumni from Sandberg Institute of Amsterdam, Dutch designers and students of CAFA (Central Academy of Fine Arts) in Beijing.

‘Starting Something’ is a dynamic and growing exhibition and offers a platform to focuses on creating opportunities to share, exchange, learn, collaborate and connect the creative industries of the cities of Amsterdam and Beijing.

Jetske Visser was invited to give a workshop and lecture based on her project ‘ROET’ and to work with the soot found in Beijing.

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